Publisher's Note: Virgil Văduva and I met several years ago and maintain the itinerant contact that is my specialty as an Aspie; very sparse and infrequent but he and my wife talk via Facebook all the time. No, I don’t have an account nor will I for a variety of reasons. When I met Virgil he struck me as extraordinarily intelligent and articulate and this essay simply proves the assertion. Enjoy. -BB The truth is that I have been thinking about writing something along these lines for a while and I just now finally got around to putting the words on paper. Avens O’Brien, who is a wonderful young lady and a writer whom I met at the 2014 Liberty Forum in New Hampshire, wrote a piece titled “12 Reasons You Are Not Getting Laid by a Libertarian Lady.” It is a fun read, but I felt like it lacked the male perspective. While this was written in jest, I am not holding much back here, so if you are wearing panties, I hope they will not bunch up in an uncomfortable knot. And while I often object to how language is being used (especially pronouns), using “we” or “us” or “you” is certainly not intended to speak on behalf of all libertarian men but it does make the discourse much easier to follow. So here are my 12 reasons why libertarian women are not getting a good libertarian guy: 1. You are a feminist Yes, you are a generation or two too late on...

19 April is the 240th anniversary of the “shot heard ‘round the world” at Lexington and Concord. The British regulars who started the fracas were following an age-old government tradition of seizing powder, munitions and property for a pretentious King who had assumed such wide distribution of the tools of resistance should be available only to the government-approved groups such as soldiers despite the danger on the frontier. We celebrate that time of defiance against tyranny when for sixteen years (1775-1791), all thirteen colonial provinces and the thousands of rural polities that existed outside or alongside the framework enjoyed a freedom they had not previously had; unfortunately after 1791 they would become enslaved once again under the totalitarian doomsday machine known as the Constitution. The lobster-backs and British taxing regime would be replaced by a domestic variety of even more extreme virulence whose sole safety mechanism was a constant western diaspora trying to escape the clutches of the “Republic”. By the middle of the 19th century, all the pieces were in play to seal the deal and Lincolnian project buried the Second American Revolution under hundreds of thousands of corpses to let freedom ring. The whitewashed history since then has lionized the inauguration of the divorce from the United Kingdom on this day and mistakenly links these events to all the “freedom” enjoyed under the Constitution. The Federalist coup in 1787 that re-established an English-style yoke of central planning, national taxation and slight tinkering with indentured servitude to a kinder and gentler tax and regulatory apparatus did no more grant individual freedom than the Romans gave to conquered lands. I won’t belabor the point here as I have done this in previous essays and the resistance commentariat has taken up the cudgel with aplomb and covered it adroitly. The Declaration of Independence, whether penned by Thomas Jefferson or Thomas Paine, is as elegant a jeremiad against tyranny as has been written. The relationship between the Declaration and the Constitution is the same as the one between the crucifix and the vampire. One cannot be consonant with the other because their aspirations are antithetical to the opposing aspirant. As the brilliant Lysander Spooner would opine: “But whether the Constitution really be one thing, or another, this much is certain - that it has either authorized such a government as we have had, or has been powerless to prevent it. In either case, it is unfit to exist.” Captain Parker commanded the militia this day for an idea that was smothered and crushed by the Federalist coup in 1787. When you look around on this day in this time at the minimum security (for now) Club Fed that is America, ask yourself what Parker would think. Everything you see (and don’t see in the surveillance state that surrounds you) is a product of the glorious Constitutional Republic that Spooner described so splendidly. As an Appleseed Instructor and Shoot Boss on extended sabbatical, part of the instruction in this extraordinary marksmanship program was a gripping retelling of the Three Strikes of the Match that led to the divorce proceedings with George III and started the First American Revolution. While I don’t share all the goals of the program hence the extended leave of absence, the telling of this ripping yarn has no match. I regret you can’t hear this from a seasoned instructor but the reading can be compelling. For those who wish further elucidation, I recommend Rothbard’s Conceived in Liberty and Fischer’s Paul Revere’s Ride. The two books will lead to many more books to better understand the hoodwinking you have suffered through government schooling and the attendant media apparatchiks who reinforce the mewlings of the mind laundries. These books will lead to better understanding the modest but brilliant interregnum when the North American Confederation was free excepting the large number of indentured servants and chattel slaves. But the Constitution would remedy this by nationalizing the former and codifying the latter. The destruction of individual liberty would begin apace. You can make sure Parker’s sacrifice, he would die in September of that year, was not in vain. Reflect and remember this day should force you to think on the state of your chains, whether you acknowledge them or not. See you at the Green Dragon Tavern. Resist. –BB

The First Strike of the Match

It’s 19 April, 1775. In Massachusetts Colony, the times were hard. The Colonial government had been abolished, and a military governor, General Thomas Gage, controlled Boston under martial law. Boston was practically a ghost town. The Port Act had seen to that, as the port had been closed to all traffic for months. The town slowly died without commerce, and many of those remaining in town relied on the kindness of outsiders to acquire food and necessities. Troops destroyed buildings and their contents for fire wood. Disease was rampant. The King was bent on breaking the radicals and bringing the colonies back in line, where they would pay dearly in taxes and subjugation to the motherland, and he was close to doing it. The precedent had been set. In order to subjugate the colonies, England would have to disarm them. The colonies had a long standing custom for militia, and the militia was armed. The most expedient method of disarmament was to take their ammunition. Gunpowder was typically stored in a specially built powder house for safety and security and drawn for the militia when needed. It was a simple matter to march in and take the colonists powder supply, and they had indeed done it before. In September of 1774, they had marched swiftly into Cambridge and carted off 250 half barrels of powder, hauling them back triumphantly to Boston. This had so alarmed the colonist that with 24 hours there were nearly 30,000 men on the march to Boston, hearing rumors that the Brits intended to burn and shell the town. The incident ended without bloodshed, but General Gage, penned up in Boston with barely 3,000 troops had been so frightened that he asked the crown for an additional 20,000 men. Paul Revere swore that this would never happen again, that they would not be taken by surprise, and instituted the Committee of Observation, an elaborate spy network throughout the colony. Then they began to smuggle arms and powder and hide them in various remote locations. They had even stolen four brass cannon right out from under Gage’s nose, a theft not taken lightly by General Gage. Then in December, Paul Revere had ridden more than 20 hours straight, through a blinding blizzard, to warn the colonists in Portsmouth, New Hampshire that a British patrol was on the way by ship to confiscate their powder and ball. The Redcoats were met by a band of militia who raised the drawbridge across the river and simply taunted them. After a short skirmish, the Brits marched back to their ships empty handed this time. But the failure stung the pride of the British Army, and they yearned for revenge. Now the stage was set for another such raid. This time to Concord where they would have the added honor of capturing not only the provincial government, which had been meeting there, illegally, but also perhaps the traitorous Sam Adams and John Hancock, who were destined, they thought, to swing from the gallows in England. There was also rumored to be quite a stockpile of war materiel stored there.
Publisher's Note: Paul is a personal friend and wrote this splendid riposte to yet another state-created crisis in freedom of association that is the latest tempest in a teapot for the usual suspects in the government supremacist commentariat. -BB Much has been made as of late, about the awful crime of discrimination in regards to one baker refusing to sell a cake to a gay couple. The left bemoans the situation as the horrid “crime” of discrimination, while the right claims it is within the purview of their “constitutional right” to religious freedom. I personally think that both sides, yet again, miss the forest for the trees. As a libertarian, I view the ensuing argument as a means of private property and will pose it to both sides as such. First of all, it is not a crime at all as no one is hurt. Sure those that get denied service might have their feelings hurt, but they are no worse off after this denial then they were before it. No one has been victimized, thus no crime has occurred. Forcing one to trade their property, without their consent, actually victimizes the one in which forced was used to remove their property. If anything, the forceful overseeing of an involuntary trade deal is the crime. While I think it a bad economic decision to turn away customers, in a consumer based business, I cannot even imagine thinking about legislating people against making bad decisions that harm no one other than themselves. After all, in a free society, people should be free to make what others may view as a bad decision. Nor can I see why anyone would want to force others to sell them, their property if someone else doesn’t like them, for whatever reason. Not only does it seem awkward, but nonsensical to force someone to make you food. I wonder what kind of “frosting” is going to go onto that cake. If you truly feel wronged by this, then use the market to rectify it. I personally think the refusing baker, just gave the gay couple a winning niche in the market place, as I am willing to bet, that per capita, gay couples would spend more money on cakes than straight couples. But let us take this argument one step further. Dating and sexual relationships take place on this planet by the 100s of billions every day. Let us now carry out “discrimination” and forced association into this realm. Should one not be able to turn down a potential suitor for any reason they choose? If let’s say, I find a black woman attractive and she doesn’t find white men attractive, and turns me down based up this notion, whether real or perceived, should I then sue to force her to date me? What if I find a lesbian attractive and she wished not to exchange her time or her body with me because of my alternate (to hers) sexual orientation? Should I be allowed to appeal to the baton of the state to force her to do so? Now let’s carry this one step further into the realm of sexual relationships. Should I be allowed to force the lesbian to have sex with me? Should I be forced to have sex with a homosexual male? How is it that a child cannot be forced to have sex with me? After all having sex is the act of sharing the time and body parts of another. Isn’t this exactly what constitutes trade?
“So far from engaging in a war to perpetuate slavery, I am rejoiced that slavery is abolished. I believe it will be greatly for the interests of the South. So fully am I satisfied of this, as regards Virginia especially, that I would cheerfully have lost all I have lost by the war, and have suffered all I have suffered, to have this object attained.” -Statement to John Leyburn (1 May 1870), as quoted in R. E. Lee: A Biography (1934) by Douglas Southall Freeman. On this day, 9 April in 1865, the Lincolnian project to enslave the entire nation under the yoke of Union supremacy, central planning and a country administered by national political fiat and the naked fist of government aggression prevailed. The South and the Confederacy for all it flaws died at Appomattox. Lee is often erroneously quoted as saying the following: “Governor, if I had foreseen the use those people designed to make of their victory, there would have been no surrender at Appomattox Courthouse; no sir, not by me. Had I foreseen these results of subjugation, I would have preferred to die at Appomattox with my brave men, my sword in my right hand. Supposed made to Governor Fletcher S. Stockdale (September 1870), as quoted in The Life and Letters of Robert Lewis Dabney, pp. 497-500.” No lesser literary luminaries and historians have said this is false than Douglas Southall Freeman, Shelby Dade Foote, Jr. and Bruce Catton. This appears to be historical myth-making by Mr. Dabney. My casual research and interest in Lee find this simply does not fit in his character; now there were certainly Confederate worthies who professed such sympathies.

I wrote this on 13 October 2003 as a date-time stamped prediction of the coming fracturing and civil war that the West initiated with its invasion and sundering of Iraq on 19 May 2003. Lew Rockwell was kind enough to make this my debut post as a columnist when I wrote there. I take no pride in accurately predicting the insurgencies that would come into full bloom throughout Iraq in the spring in 2004. All the usual suspects in the Washington political clown posse assured the taxpayers of the West that things would be smooth as glass. “Months before the United States invaded Iraq in 2003, Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld forbade military strategists from developing plans for securing a post-war Iraq… In fact, said Brig. Gen. Mark Scheid, Rumsfeld said ‘he would fire the next person’ who talked about the need for a post-war plan… ‘I remember the secretary of defense saying that he would fire the next person that said that,’ Scheid said. ‘We would not do planning for Phase 4 operations, which would require all those additional troops that people talk about today.’ ‘[Rumsfeld] said we will not do that because the American public will not back us if they think we are going over there for a long war.’” Here is where some of those brilliant media presstitutes are today who championed the invasion of Iraq. “Gen. John Keane, the vice chief of the Army staff during the war, said some defense officials believed the exiles' promises. "We did not see it...

Publisher’s Note: Just a note that I quote Reagan for one of his few sober thoughts on economics because while he talked a good game, he was no more fiscally conservative than any of the Presidents following Eisenhower and succeeding him in office in 1989. I will give Reagan his due for reducing income tax rates from a high of 70% to 28% but no closer to zero than my comfort zone for taxation. Eisenhower managed to reduce government spending per GDP by two percentage points, not Reagan who spent absurd amounts of other people’s money and popularized deficit spending for the voter mobs. I highly recommend The Great Deformation by former Reagan advisor David Stockman for a fairly thorough analysis of the fiat currency and bankster chaos that has consumed the American economy for the better part of a century. I don't agree with all of Stockman's conclusions and his continuing faith in the "right" regulatory regime is quaint but illusory in application. -BB “You can’t tax business. Business doesn’t pay taxes. It collects taxes.” ― Ronald Reagan Taxation is theft and the acquisition of other people’s resources with a velvet glove backed by a mailed fist. It is simply one of the many ways in which the state brutalizes and impoverishes its tax cattle on a daily basis. Despite the government-media complex insistence that the tax rate in America is tolerable if not fair, anything above zero is morally wrong if the robbed don’t agree implicitly and consensually to the mugging for whatever fantastic services the state proclaims it provides. The French aren't the only ones to achieve a 100 percent tax rate, they're just more blunt about it. So I want to destroy a myth, I want to show you through sheer numbers and data that the state in America has a tax rate that exceeds 100% to which the normal American having had a proper government education will insist that is impossible. I’d like to excise some of the population that is obviously at this point. Now the tax rate for incarcerated Americans is exactly 100% since their lives have been stolen in total. The tax rate on certain targeted marijuana businesses in the US under IRS code 280E are taxed in excess of 80% (some approaching 100%). “I believe that the feds extend the drug war through 280E,” said Cornelius. “If (the federal government) can’t put them out of business legally when voters are mandating these businesses to move forward, it’s very easy to put them out of business financially. A lot of times, instead of paying a tax rate that should be 30 to 40 [percent], they are paying rates between 80 or 90 percent. I even have a client right now that is paying more than 100 [percent] effective tax rate.” Apart from the sheer moral hazard and absolute immorality of the aforementioned cases, I would suggest that all Americans pay an effective tax rate that exceeds 100% even though that beggar’s belief and rational thought but we are talking about the government. Direct taxation in America on the Helots residing within and without the US and its territories is enormous and takes on many tangential impacts. “The United States is the only country that taxes its citizens’ worldwide income, even when those citizens live indefinitely abroad.” An ordinary US subject will pay Federal, state (43) and/or city income taxes, property taxes, excise taxes, sin taxes, sales taxes, Socialist Security, Medicare, unemployment and corporate income taxes. I have given a brief overview of most progressive taxes and there are regressive taxes like the gasoline tax that the Feds are gnashing their fangs over since prices have gone down and they were foolish enough to assign a percentage of price instead of flat fixed levy. Then there are the death taxes to pay a gratuity to the state(s) per the required death levy once the owner has assumed room temperature and you are taxed once again on monies that have already had taxes stolen from the whole. This tax is 18-40% on previously taxed assets. Of course, there are the beloved sales taxes. “As of January 1st, 2014, 5 states (Alaska, Delaware, Montana, New Hampshire and Oregon) do not levy a sales tax, while California has the highest state tax rate at 7.5%.” Now, the New York City local sales and use tax rate is 4.5 percent. City and state sales tax combined is 8.875 percent, so your mileage may vary. The five states with the highest average combined state-local sales tax rates are Tennessee (9.45 percent), Arkansas (9.19 percent), Louisiana (8.89 percent), Washington (8.88 percent), and Oklahoma (8.72 percent). These do not include the additional imposts added on by municipal and county predators, which make the total approach 10%.
 I previously highlighted the importance of a survival library and plenty of readers chimed in on the need for real hands-on experience and training as a necessity to having the knowledge to set the flame to the candle as it were. Matthew Crawford gave us a glimpse of the importance of that. -BB It seems that during every shift in the fundamentals of industry, there has been an intrinsic reaction on the part of man to protect the older forms of production as a means to alleviate the perceived threat of the looming change. One example would be the original saboteurs, who were so named by throwing their wooden clogs, or sabots, into the gears of automated looms. Another example would be the arts and crafts movement of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, which sought to provide the newly minted white-collar industrial manager with a weekend outlet via the manual arts. There is a familiar sneer and condescending attitude of white-collar workers on blue-collar “hands-on” professions that don’t demand formal engineering credentials. The office and knowledge workers have the mistaken impression that no problem solving nor cognition are necessary to achieve these “dirty-hands” task yet these very men are the ones who will not only survive and persevere but may possess the heterodox knowledge necessary to muscle through difficult times whether mundane or apocalyptic. Much like thrift stores are capitalism’s savvy answer to rational recycling, blue-collar workers may be the ultimate conservationists and environmentalists in a way no current envirus can even envision in their beggared imaginations freighted with collectivist fantasies of government supremacism. The latest entry into this tradition is Matthew Crawford's Shop Class as Soulcraft: An Inquiry Into the Value of Work.  Crawford's work is a serious philosophic examination of the value of the manual trades, specifically those who build and repair material things. Crawford has serious credibility both as an academic, with a PhD in Political Philosophy from the University of Chicago, and as a mechanic since he owns and operates Reclaimed Vehicle Fabrication Laboratory in Richmond, Virginia. Crawford's theses is that as the American economy rapidly shifted from manufacturing to nebulous "knowledge work", we began a sort of cultural schizophrenia, where consumption and the management consultant's definition of "creativity" replaced skill with tools and a certain level of mechanical competence and experiential knowledge about how things worked. He is publishing a new book this year called The World Beyond Your Head: On Becoming an Individual in an Age of Distraction available on 1 April 2015. Crawford's work first appeared in an essay in The New Atlantis Magazine. Since Mr. Crawford can summarize his points better than I could, here is a brief excerpt: "A decline in tool use would seem to betoken a shift in our mode of inhabiting the world: more passive and more dependent. And indeed, there are fewer occasions for the kind of spiritedness that is called forth when we take things in hand for ourselves, whether to fix them or to make them. What ordinary people once made, they buy; and what they once fixed for themselves, they replace entirely or hire an expert to repair, whose expert fix often involves installing a pre-made replacement part. So perhaps the time is ripe for reconsideration of an ideal that has fallen out of favor: manual competence, and the stance it entails toward the built, material world. Neither as workers nor as consumers are we much called upon to exercise such competence, most of us anyway, and merely to recommend its cultivation is to risk the scorn of those who take themselves to be the most hard-headed: the hard-headed economist will point out the opportunity costs of making what can be bought, and the hard-headed educator will say that it is irresponsible to educate the young for the trades, which are somehow identified as the jobs of the past. But we might pause to consider just how hard-headed these presumptions are, and whether they don’t, on the contrary, issue from a peculiar sort of idealism, one that insistently steers young people toward the most ghostly kinds of work."
I am an incurable bibliophile who has a substantial library holding. I even had a library annex in my former house at the Circle A Ranch.  Once we acquire new digs here in Arizona I will be making a more portable solution by building an outbuilding with floor to ceiling bookshelves that is air-conditioned. The coming Endarkenment is surely a signal to start accumulating a non-electronic portfolio of texts and tomes that sustain you and yours in the approaching of Ragnarok.  As a nod to my acceptance of the electronic publishing revolution in book availability (my own book is Kindle only on Amazon), I have a rather large portable library that goes everywhere with me on my wonderful Kindle DX; I have entertained getting a new Kindle Paperwhite and loading it with survival and self-sufficiency tomes and tucking it into a Maxpedition admin pouch with a solar battery charger. Nonetheless in a grid-up or grid-down scenario, this may be useful but will be a worthless paperweight in an EMP event. I started this journey in my techno-hippie days with the Whole Earth Catalog. That project still resonates with me. I wish some ambitious entrepreneur would revise and update that project. I also wish the entire CoEvolution Quarterly/ Whole Earth Review were available on digits. Jerry Pournelle wrote Lucifer’s Hammer in 1984 and many significant books have been published since then that may be added to the list. I welcome reader’s comments and suggestions for additions to the list. I would add the revised 54 volume Great Books of the Western World, not the horrific 60 volume successor, the Harvard Five Shelf of Books and the innumerable military manuals that have become available digitally over the last decade like the Engineering Data books, Ranger Handbooks and FM 7-8 (Light Infantry Platoon and Squad). The first two sets can found dirt-cheap on the used market. Some other resources can found in this post at the Long Now Foundation. One of my readers has alerted me to the utter uselessness of post 1940s Merck manuals that are simply drug dispensation instructions. If you are trying to complete this "bucket list", be cautious what you purchase. More to follow on a proper medical library for FREEFOR. The list is long and encyclopedic but it speaks to the innumerable invisible infrastructures that make our lives rather effortless...for now. It literally echoes in eternity -BB Bucket # 1 Standard Handbook for Civil Engineers, Frederick S. Merritt, Second Edition, McGraw-Hill 1976 Tubular Steel Structures: Theory & Design, M.S. Troitsky, Arc Welding Foundation, 1982 Design of Welded Structures, O.W. Blodgett, Arc Welding Foundation, 1966 The Engineer's Handbook Illustrated, Arthur Liebers, Key Publishing, NY, 1968 Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems Manual, EPA, 2002 Smoley’s Parallel Tables of Logarithms & Squares for Engineers, Architects and Students, C.P. Smoley, 1965 Bucket # 2 Gear Cutting Practice: Methods of Producing Gears for Commercial Use Including Wartime Data Supplement, Fred Colvin & Frank Stanley, McGraw-Hill, 1943 Punches and Dies: Layout, Construction and Use Including Wartime Data Supplement, Frank Stanley, McGraw-Hill, 1943 Turning and Boring Practice, Modern Machine Tools and Methods Used in Representative Plants, Fred Colvin & Frank Stanley, McGraw-Hill, 1943 Jigs and Fixtures, Fred Colvin & Lucius Haas, McGraw-Hill, 1943 Steam Power Plants, Philip J. Potter, Ronald Press, 1949 The Home Mechanic's Handbook: Encyclopedia of Tools, Materials, Methods and Directions, Various Authors, D. Van Nostrand, 1945 Strength of Materials, Alfred Pourman, McGraw-Hill, 1937 Home Plumber's Bible, Ramesh Singhai, McGraw-Hill, 1978 Electric Motor Repair, Robert Rosenberg, 1946 Interior Electric Wiring and Estimating, Albert Uhl, Arthur Nelson and Carl Dunlap, American Technical Society, 1947 Electrical Wiring: Residential, William J. Whitney, Wiley and Sons, 1979 Practical Electrical Wiring: Residential, Farm and Industrial, H.P. Richter, McGraw-Hill, 1947 Bucket # 3 The Backyard Builder, Edited by John Warde, Rodale, 1985 Residential Carpentry, Mortimer P. Reed, Wiley & Sons, 1980 Essential of Drafting, James D. Bethune, Prentice Hall, 1977 The Homeowner's Book of Plumbing and Repair, K.W. Sessions, Wiley & Sons, 1978 Complete Encyclopedia of Stitchery, Mildred Graves Ryan, Doubleday, 1979 The Practical Handyman's Encyclopedia (3 volumes of 22 total) Bucket # 4 The Timber Framing Book, Elliott and Wallas, Housesmith, 1977 Book of Bikes and Bicycling, Dick Teresi, Popular Mechanics, 1975 Readers Digest Complete Guide to Sewing, 1976 Readers Digest Back to Basics: How to Learn and Enjoy Traditional American Skills, 1981 Readers Digest Complete Do-It-Yourself Manual, 1973 Reader's Digest Practical Problem Solver, 1992 Earl Proux's Yankee Home Hints, Yankee Books, 1993 Yankee Magazine's Make It Last by Earl Proux, Yankee Books, 1996 Whittlin', Whistles and Thingamajigs, Harlan G. Metcalfe, Castle, 1974 Bucket # 5 Basic Construction Techniques for Houses and Small Buildings Simply Explained, United States Navy, Bureau of Naval Personnel, Dover Press, 1972 Tools and How To Use Them, Jackson and Day, Wings Books, 1992 The Homestead Builder, CP Dwyer, Lyons Press, 1872/1998 Carpenter's and Builder's Library: Millwork, Power Tools and Painting, John E. Ball, Audells, 1976 Carpenter's and Builder's Library: Tools, Steel Square, and Joinery, John E. Ball, Audells, 1978 Carpenter's and Builder's Library:Builder's Math, Plans and Specifications, John E. Ball, Audells, 1978 The Practical Handyman's Encyclopedia (10 volumes of 22 total) Bucket # 6 The Practical Handyman's Encyclopedia (9 volumes of 22 total) Architectural Drawings and Light Construction, Second Edition, Edward J. Muller, Prentice Hall, 1976 Freshwater Fishes, Lawrence Page and Brooks Burr, Peterson, 1991 Field Guide to Trees and Shrubs, George Petrides, Peterson, 1972 Bucket # 7 Piloting, Seamanship and Small Boat Handling, Charles F. Chapman, Hearst Press, 1966 McClane's Standard Fishing Encyclopedia and International Angling Guide, Editied by A.J. McClane, Holt-Rinehart, 1965 The Complete Book of Canoeing and Kayaking, Paul Fillingham, Drake, 1976 The Annapolis Book of Seamanship, John Rousmaniere, Simon & Shuster, 1989 Heat Engines: Steam, Gas, Steam Turbines and their Auxiliaries, J.R. Allen and J.A. Bursley, McGraw-Hill, 1910. Architectural Graphic Standards, G.G. Ramsey and H.R. Sleeper, Wiley & Sons, 1962 The Metal Trades Handbook, R.G. Garby and B.J. Ashton, Jasper, 1985 Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Reptiles and Amphibians, J.L. Behler and F.W. King, Knopf, 1979 Bucket # 8 The Way Things Work, An Illustrated Encyclopedia of Technology, Volume One, Simon & Schuster, 1967 The Way Things Work, Volume Two, Simon & Schuster, 1971 The New Way Things Work, David Macaulay, Houghton-Mifflin, 1998. Logan's Medical and Scientific Abbreviations, Carolynn Logan & M. Katherine Price, Lippincott, 1987 Complete Book of Athletic Taping Techniques, J.V. Cerney, Parker, 1972 Basic Carpentry, John Capotosto, Reston, 1975 The Procedure Handbook of Arc Welding, 12th Edition, Lincoln Electric Company, 1973 The Encyclopedia of Common Diseases, Prevention Magazine, 1976 What Herbs are all About: A Basic Primer Outlining the Practical Uses of Medicinal Plants, J.J. Challem & Renate Levin-Challem, Keats, 1980 Bucket # 9 English Bread and Yeast Cookery, Elizabeth David, Biscuit Books, 1977 The Doctor's Book of Home Remedies, Editors of Prevention Magazine, Rodale, 1990 Gardening for Food and Fun, USDA Yearbook, 1977 Grass, USDA Yearbook, 1948 Crockett's Victory Garden, James Crockett, Little-Brown, 1977 Complete Guide to Sewing, Reader's Digest, 1976 Advanced Home Gardening, Miranda Smith, Creative Homeowner Press, no date Pastures for the South, George H. King, Creative, 1954 Fruits for the Home Garden, Ken & Pat Kraft, Morrow, 1968 The Best Gardening Ideas I Know, Robert Rodale, Rodale Press, 1974 The Best Gardening Ideas I Know, Robert Rodale, Rodale Press, 1978 Bucket # 10 The Wise Garden Encyclopedia: A Practical and Convenient Guide to Every Detail of Gardening Written for All Climates, Soils, Seasons and Methods, Ed. by E.L.D. Seymour, Grossett & Dunlap, 1970 Betty Crocker's Kitchen Gardens, Mary Mason Campbell, Scribners, 1971 Folk Medicine: A Vermont Doctor's Guide to Good Health, D.C. Jarvis, M.D., Henry Holt, 1958 10,000 Garden Questions, Volume One, Ed. by F.F. Rockwell, Doubleday, 1959 How to Treat Yourself with Chinese Herbs, Dr. Hong-Yen Hsu, Keats, 1980 Ferns of Alabama by Blanche E. Dean, Southern University Press, 1969 Today's Herbal Health, Louise Tenney, Woodland, 1983 The Encyclopedia of Organic Gardening, Organic Gardening Magazine, Rodale Press, 1978 The Organic Gardener's Handbook of Natural Insect and Disease Control, Ed. by B.W. Ellis & F.M. Bradley, Rodale, 1992 An American Herbal: Using Plants for Healing, Nelson Coon, Rodale, 1979 Stalking the Good Life, Euell Gibbons, McKay, 1971 Earl Mindell's Herb Bible, E. Mindell, Fireside, 1992

  “The enemy will pass slowly from the offensive to the defensive. The blitzkrieg will transform itself into a war of duration. Thus, the enemy will be caught in a dilemma: He has to drag out the war in order to win it, and does not possess, on the other hand, the psychological and political means to fight a long, drawn-out war.” - Robert Taber, The War of the Flea The DoD and the Army have now inaugurated yet another iteration of the constant doctrinal battle to balance irregular warfare and conventional warfare. Since the beginning, the US armed forces have struggled to deliver on a force concept that could do either or both well. As William Lind has pointed out eloquently, the US and western powers have enunciated the generations of warfare, but failed to deliver on advancing through the sequence or even gleaning the wisdom they hold. There are four generally accepted generations of warfare, and the succeeding generations that provide grist for the mill among the defense intellectuals and military-industrial illiterarti who constantly tilt at the next big thing. For the purposes of this introduction, we will stick to the four generations commonly accepted. First Generation Warfare began at the Treaty of Westphalia in 1648 where a convention of European armies and heads of state decided a civilizing residual of warfare should formally prohibit the engagement of non-combatants in warfare throughout the continent. This, of course, did not obtain in the planetary battlefields these European powers would fight on in pursuit of...

“It is the greatest truth of our age: information is not knowledge.” - Caleb Carr Barack Obama is a facile and Machiavellian intriguer of the highest order. I will leave to others in the commentariat to discuss his bona fides for President, his abhorrent collectivist notions of governing and all the other platitudes that point to a creature that has provided the planetary if not historical model for the dangers of the Peter Principle. He is a man out of his depth, which may be anything beyond a minor city council position, and even that would be a stretch. His keen narcissism keeps him wandering through ironic swamps without realizing he is soaked through. Recently, his teleprompters gave yet another interminable and meandering speech on “violent extremism,” rich in historical ignorance and laced with rhetorical nonsense befitting a man who can speak for hours and not say a word of any consequence. The National Socialist and Communist bloviators of old don’t hold a candle to the verbal hypocrisy and magniloquence this man spews without communicating anything but the status quo. I have insisted this is Bush’s fourth term and this latest milquetoast broadside does nothing more than confirm that. I suffer through these speeches and, thanks the Gods, I never had such a feckless and talent-less professor chain me to a classroom to listen to such drivel for a semester much less four years. If Obama does anything morally right, it will usually be by mistake and not design. In his usual doublespeak, he continuously weaves over the line but never reaches the target. “By “violent extremism,” we don’t just mean the terrorists who are killing innocent people. We also mean the ideologies, the infrastructure of extremists --the propagandists, the recruiters, the funders who radicalize and recruit or incite people to violence. We all know there is no one profile of a violent extremist or terrorist, so there’s no way to predict who will become radicalized. Around the world, and here in the United States, inexcusable acts of violence have been committed against people of different faiths, by people of different faiths -- which is, of course, a betrayal of all our faiths. It's not unique to one group, or to one geography, or one period of time.” His protestations ring hollow; fine words and empty promises. The faiths are irrelevant and the modes of operation are the key. Ask any aboriginal American. This is much like Hitler criticizing the brutality of the communist regime in the USSR or vice versa. This is the same administration that complains about the incineration of a Jordanian pilot and then glibly justifies the drone attacks and indiscriminate bombings that have characterized aspects of the robot war in the conflicts in the Middle East. Apparently, the drones are equipped with water balloons and party hats that they drop as a deadly payload instead of incendiary devices. The international community and the West has wrestled with the definition of terrorism for decades because it just tread a very delicate path. Simply, terrorism is politically motivated violence against innocents and combatants. The US Department of Defense (an ironic sobriquet in itself) defines it as "the unlawful use of violence or threat of violence to instill fear and coerce governments or societies. Terrorism is often motivated by religious, political, or other ideological beliefs and committed in the pursuit of goals that are usually political." You’ll note the graybeards in the DoD are very specific in the use of the term lawful because government is the self-satisfied arbiter of lawful terrorism. Absent the terrorist methodology, no government on earth or in history would last a day. Governments and the state invest themselves with right to initiate, threaten and commit violence against the entire populace in their respective tax jurisdictions. Let’s conduct a thought experiment: if IS (or ISIS or whatever today’s new version is) wore US police uniforms and conducted their daily savagery in that mufti, would they be the subject of the White House broadsides and misdirection? If the IS wore Western style military uniforms and gave lip service to the laws of land warfare and international codes of conduct yet proceeded apace with this barbarism, would the Offal Office be up in arms, as it were?