“Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity.” - Hanlon’s Razor
If government had a working axiom, it would be this: To pursue and defend mediocrity wherever it is found and to institute it where it is absent. The larger a government, the more idiotic and destructive its behavior appears to both the casual and educated observer. Historical hindsight provides legions of examples of government not only doing stupid things daily and reinforcing failure but creating advance extinction events that spell their doom as they happily march to their own funeral. One can suppose that a confirmation bias exist in its functionaries and bureaucrats that make them immune to common sense and inevitability. A large percentage of government officials and a little less so their apparatchiks peppering the thousands of agencies in the US seem oblivious to the sheer lack of efficacy and effectiveness in accomplishing anything they set out to do. A small percentage of those, larger among elected officials, are psychopaths and sociopaths whose very life trajectories demand the subordination of others through threats or actual violence; government legitimizes criminal violence in the minds of the actors and the half-witted supporters of government supremacism. The state is the world’s leading provider of rationales for using immoral means to achieve moral ends and every sober observer can see how that has ended. Whether the slow and sclerotic death of vital commerce systems like the Keystone Keynesian recipe for national economic seppuku so popular with the mandarins in DC or the naked economic illiteracy of the Keynesian cousin in Marxism, the results are the same. The formation of vast prison states where every human transaction is vertically and horizontally regulated through taxation, regulation and police violence. Historically, the only liberation that occurred has been the death knells of these systems as they were riven by war, collapsed of their own contradictions, like the USSR or simply crushed every incentive through moronic regulation, excessive taxation and iatrogenic effect like the US and the EU. The freed market has a severe disciplinary function that culls bad business and removes poor entrepreneurs; the price signals dictate who continues to purchase goods and service now and into the future. Bad business simply ceases to attract consumers who vote through purchase and the ineffective firm dries up and blows away to make way for a more effective competitor. Governments don’t do that nor do they have the incentives to do. The state works on perverse incentives that collectivizes risks and privatizes reward to politically connected mechanisms. This is one of the reasons the franchise at the atomistic level makes zero rational sense in any meaningful way and why focused and targeted lobbying of elected interests and their tentacled regulatory agencies are hypersensitive to political fortunes and trade winds. In other words, the single vote cast by a human in an election in America has an extraordinarily low percentage of effectiveness while the focused purchasing of political influence through lobbying has tremendous benefits. One need only look at the money spent to win the crime family position in the White House to see the results. Obama and Romney each spent approximately one billion a piece to seize control of a potential budget exceeding 3.8 trillion dollars in acknowledged spending.  One can see the cold logic in spending that amount of money to gain control over the Federal purse strings and the huge violence apparatus it wields over the tax cattle known as citizens. I employ the term acknowledged because the government clearly cooks the books as evidenced by scandal after scandal and the sheer ineptitude and incompetency of the DoD accounting infrastructure as an example.

Publishers Note:  Hunter is a young man I have had occasion to meet only in the ether on the Interweb. He is a bright and enthusiastic abolitionist who came to it at an early age. He is yet another budding guest author who has offered me an essay to publish to help lessen my writing burden. I am crafting two more books this year and time is a harsh disciplinarian. In the following effort, he offers a simple but vital remedy to what ails most of us in these tempestuous times in the Endarkenment in the USSA. Enjoy. -BB  The world is indeed waking up. I’ve noticed this reoccurring theme of cynicism throughout individuals I talk to who are actually intelligent enough in the first place to understand the puppet show right in front of our eyes, see it as though it will never change. Being somewhat of a pessimist myself, I can definitely understand this but if you can force yourself for just one moment to look at it all objectively, you may come to understand the situation from a different perspective. Throughout history, there have been two types of people: those like us (you that are reading this right now) who are proactive and are the first to seek out the issues within society and the world itself in order to “keep the ball rolling” in an evolutionary sense. We are Progressives, but not as the State or many common folk would describe. Instead, we are progressive in that...

Publisher's Note: Jim Klein has been a friend of mine and this site for years and he is one of the smartest observers in the individualist abolitionist milieu out there. He always makes a clear and concise case for why life should triumph over death and peace is a better solution than government subsidized and incentivized eternal conflict. Enjoy. -BB “Hey Joe, may I borrow your lawnmower?” “Sure Tom, there’s half a tank of gas in it.” There.  That’s a loan.  Joe loaned Tom his lawnmower.  It was an agreement.  It was about something physical–the lawnmower–but the loan itself was just a mental act.  It was an act of consent between two volitional men. There’s nothing else to it.  If Tom fills up the tank, then it was a profitable loan for Joe.  If he empties the tank, then it was a loss for Joe.  But neither profit nor loss has anything to do with the nature of the loan.  We can add terms to the loan–Tom will sharpen the blade, fill the tank, pay some money, use it for one day–but none of those terms change what the loan is…a mutual agreement, a promise to deliver or use a good or service. That’s what your money is…that and nothing else.  It is a loan, a loan originated at a Central Bank and passed through many, many hands until it gets to you.  It is a promise to do something.  The Banks and government promise that others will accept that money “as payment for all...

  Publisher's Note:  This is James' first contribution to the blog and he does an excellent job talking about the book. I highly recommend James J. Martin's book Men Against the State for an earlier compendium about 19th century individualist anarchists in America. -BB Libertarian Anarchy: Against the State Gerard Casey, an Associate Professor of Philosophy at University College in Dublin, Ireland, and an Adjunct Scholar at the Mises Institute, has written a concise, excellently sourced treatise promoting the political philosophy he labels “libertarian anarchy”. Professor Casey writes in large part from a Rothbardian perspective, as one sees by his very first sentence:  “States are criminal organizations”. He distinguishes libertarianism from libertinism, noting that libertarians may live by strict moral principles, yet “the law has no business enforcing purely moral considerations”. Casey describes the “limited objectives” of his compact, well -written and well -argued brief for liberty as the following: 1)     To show the anti-libertarian character of states and state action 2)     To argue for the presumption of liberty 3)     To make the case for libertarian anarchy 4)     To show that law does not require state sponsorship 5)     To demonstrate the illegitimacy of the modern state by means of an attack on the representative nature of democracy and the validity of state constitutions He accomplishes these objectives, to this reader, without exception. He provides an apt metaphor of the state as “the Wizard of Oz, a small man with a megaphone pulling levers behind a curtain”. Casey begins by addressing the overriding myth prevailing in contemporary society, “The belief in the legitimacy...

“Gentlemen, when the enemy is committed to a mistake we must not interrupt him too soon.” ― Horatio Nelson
The current strategic climate in DC reveals a deeply flawed and idiotic tendency to think that the mandarins in Mordor can simply click their ruby slippers and wish things to happen. The huge strategic blunders of the Busheviks is of a different ocher and hue than the mismanagement in DC today. The post 9/11 answer was to get the US involved in endless and ultimately fratricidal conflicts throughout the Middle East and the Horn of Africa for no better reason than bluster and the military industrial complex wagging the mangy mutts in the Pentagon and Capitol Hill. The new occupant of the Offal Office is indeed altering course but frustrated by the emergence of a Russian power that refuses to yield to American huffing and puffing. Aside from the hubris of lecturing the Russians on invading other countries, the failure to prevent the Russians from doing as they wish as regional hegemons is the signal to America that the 21st century is no longer theirs to control nor rule as a hyper-power astride the globe.
Ever since the first American imperialist excursions into Canada and Mexico and the subsequent invasion of the globe in 1893 after the Lincolnian coup that sealed the fate of the nation and put all Americans on the plantation. US bloodthirstiness in planetary command and control has known no limits but after the War to Safe Josef Stalin made the world safe for communism, American successes militarily have been few and far between. Even the allegedly successful Gulf War I simply laid the foundations for the ensuing conflicts and reemergence of global non-state actors.
The rest is history and the last two presidents have been strategic bumblers of historic proportions.
I often think WWI lasted from 1914-1945 with a Cold War bridge in the interregnum years and consider the conflict from 1938-1945 to be the War to Save Josef Stalin. So I would like to examine a slice of the strategic dissonance that affected both sides in that storied conflict.
“Defeat Germany first” characterized the germination of any global strategy on the part of the allies, the United States and Great Britain, in particular.  Even after the attack on Pearl Harbor, the priority remained in the European Theater of Operations (ETO).  US naval advocates naturally objected to this priority in the war.  WWII forced a particular focus due to the breadth and width of the conflict that essentially embroiled every continent on Earth, including naval engagements near Antarctica.
The locus of strategy finds its working component in the operations conducted to fulfill the goals and ambitions of the grand strategic/strategic intent of the combatant nations.  Very little coordination was necessary due to their paucity in national membership and the sheer span of distance between the two largest compatriot nations in the Axis alliance. This simplified the strategic framework for both nations, Germany in particular.  The German military staff and associated civilian components probably brought the deepest and best expertise to crafting and fleshing out a strategy married to operations that would achieve the goals.

In this celebration of Saint Patrick's Day, we should reflect on the liberation of Ireland at the beginning of the twentieth century as a demonstration project of how it is done. Michael Collins would play a larger than life role in bringing this divorce in the court of world opinion and rubbing the English nose in it. He would be an unknown contemporary of other giants like T.E. Lawrence and Paul Emil von Leetow-Vorbeck at the turn of the collectivist century.He would stare down one of the other giants, the statist and war-loving Winston Churchill and win. -BB

"Realists appealed to Collins. There would be no more glorious protests in arms, he decided. He built a cadre of realists around him, first in the IRB, then at Volunteer headquarters, where he took over Pearse’s old post as Director of Organization before becoming Director of Intelligence, finally in Dáil Eireann, as the underground government’s very effective Minister for Finance. Collins was a doer. Essentially a well-informed opportunist with very few scruples, his entire ideology could be stated in five words: ‘The Irish should govern themselves.’" 

-  Sean Cronin, "Irish Nationalism: A History of its Roots and Ideology"

"The characteristics which mark Collins out as a remarkably successful Director of Intelligence during the War of Independence include his evident appreciation of the importance of the collection and assessment of information as primary elements of intelligence operations which should precede action; his partial penetration of his adversary’s own intelligence system; the efficiency and ruthlessness with which action based on good intelligence was taken; and his success in preserving the security and efficiency of his own organization both in Dublin and in Britain despite the pressures it operated under because of the constant threat of raids, arrests and the capture of documents."

 -  Eunan O'Halpin, "Collins and Intelligence: 1919-1923 From Brotherhood to Bureaucracy" (in the anthology Michael Collins and the Making of the Irish State)

 Introduction

Michael Collins was a tough young Irish operative during the seminal years of Eire’s final divorce from the United Kingdom at the beginning of the twentieth century.  This essay will attempt to discover if Collins was the culminating point that brought Number Ten Downing Street to the negotiation table, stared down Winston Churchill and came home with the solution for Irish independence from the British Crown. Ireland was invaded and occupied the British crown in 1169 and suffered a brutal occupation punctuated by indigenous risings, rebellions and pockets of resistance. Sinn Féin emerged in 1905 to formalize a political vehicle to liberate the Irish from the British occupation.  These sophisticated rebel organizations started to emerge in the in the 19th and 20th century, culminating in the 1916 Easter Rising which led to the mismatch and overreach that would be the undoing of English rule over the Irish. Michael Collins would emerge as the premier guerrilla leader during the crucial struggle between 1916 and 1922.  He embodied the early germination of the non-state soldier as a twentieth century variation on the age-old warrior in history and fought in Ireland under a variety of covers and positions within the political hierarchy of the Irish Republican Brotherhood (IRB).  Collins would fight for the next four years culminating on Bloody Sunday on 21 November 1920.

 The Rising in 1916

During the Easter week of 24-30 April 1916, the IRB fielded the Irish Volunteers and smaller elements of Irish nationalists rose in armed rebellion in Dublin against the British crown.  The violence was a tremendous shock to the authorities in London and they reacted with enormous disproportionate use of military and constabulary forces to quell the rebellion.   “The British Army reported casualties of 116 dead, 368 wounded and nine missing. Sixteen policemen died, and 29 were wounded. Rebel and civilian casualties were 318 dead and 2,217 wounded. The Volunteers and ICA recorded 64 killed in action, but otherwise Irish casualties were not divided into rebels and civilians.” [1] Executions and reprisals followed and Collins started to rise in the ranks to prominence in the aftermath of the Fort Sumter of the twentieth century Irish revolution against the Crown and eventually a bloody civil war that would pit Irishman against Irishman.

Several readers have requested that I compile a recommended reading compendium similar to Billy Beck’s. I think Beck’s list is masterful and I wanted to bifurcate the list and add my own annotated comments to any I have read and additional selections I would recommend. When I read Beck’s list, I wondered at how our libraries and antelibraries could be so similar. Before I sold my house, I had a library annex attached to it from which I could browse and remove volumes to peruse at my leisure. Since moving, most are now in storage so I have to rely on my addled memory. The first part is here. Here is the second accompaniment to Beck’s list: Liberty and the State and I only included those volumes he and I have both read. My annotated comments are in italics below his, along with any additional books I think are pertinent to the one just reviewed. The Black Book of Communism, 1999, Stephane Courtois, et. al. -- Comprehensive catalogue of the consequences of a manifestly evil philosophy. Unprecedented in its global scope. All the rats in one bag. There is no doubt this is a standard tome that should be on every collectivist observer’s bookshelf. There is an apocryphal story that the usual suspects in academia and the media were bleating indignantly over the release of the book and its heavily footnoted and documented indictment of their beloved creed. Some went so far as to say that the Communists may have murdered millions but they did it out of love and not hate like the National Socialists. The Great Terror -- A Reassessment, 1990, Robert Conquest -- The landmark study of the most virulent madness that the world ever saw. I had the opportunity to intern under Conquest and thought that not only was he one of the brilliant researchers of the Communist Terror State but he was a voice in the wilderness during a time when fellating the state was the watchword of all hip Kremlinologists. Reflections On A Ravaged Century, 2000, Robert Conquest -- Worthwhile thoughts on why the 20th century went the way it went. Again, Conquest has not written anything on Soviet Communism not worth reading. The Gulag Archipelago -- An Experiment in Literary Investigation, 1918-1956 (three volumes), 1973, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn -- An enormous look at hell rendered with the original 20th century aptitude for the work of the thing. Even after many years of familiarity with the worst Nazi crimes, this was shocking to me. It matches its 1900-odd page heft with psychic impact. Huge, in every dimension. One is constantly amazed at the lengths modern collectivists will go to in defending the state and diminishing the importance of Solzhenitsyn. I recommend two additional books in his canon: One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich The Oak and the Calf: Sketches of Literary Life in the Soviet Union The first is a textbook primer on how cheap life is when the government is in charge of everything while the second treats the personal aspects of Solzhenitsyn’s courage and moral fortitude to stand alone and disarmed to the might of the USSR and claim the high ground against the leviathan. I also recommend Applebaum’s history of the gulag. Much like the police and government apologists of today who rush to the defense and rationalization of the most barbaric behavior, Applebaum attempts to remedy this as thoroughly as the editors of the Black Book of Communism. Gulag: A History The Secret World of American Communism, 1995, Klehr, Haynes, and Firsov -- A history of the Communist Party of the United States (CPUSA) documented from Soviet archives, illustrating its subversion and espionage. The state of the data, today.
Several readers have requested that I compile a recommended reading compendium similar to Billy Beck’s. I think Beck’s list is masterful and I wanted to bifurcate the list and add my own annotated comments to any I have read and additional selections I would recommend. When I read Beck’s list, I wondered at how our libraries and antelibraries could be so similar. Before I sold my house, I had a library annex attached to it from which I could browse and remove volumes to peruse at my leisure. Since moving, most are now in storage so I have to rely on my addled memory. I divided his list into War and the State and Liberty and the State and only included those volumes he and I have both read. My annotated comments are in italics below his. Along with any additional books I think are pertinent to the one just reviewed. Hitler And Stalin -- Parallel Lives, 1991, Alan Bullock -- It's astonishing to me that it took until the last decade of the 20th century for someone to write this book, because the comparisons are so obvious. It was worth the wait, because Bullock thoroughly exhausts the comparisons. Indispensable. I am not astonished at how long it took for this to show up and think the comparisons are uncanny even at a deep and sophisticated level, psychopaths and sociopaths have a surprisingly narrow playbook and when given the tools of power will put the pedal to the meddle. I also recommend Gandhi & Churchill: The Epic Rivalry that Destroyed an Empire and Forged Our Age which shows the relationship between two state titans of the twentieth century and how the Indians used both violent and non-violent resistance to dispose of the most powerful world power on Earth before 1930. Russia At War, 1941--1945, 1964, Alexander Werth -- Enormous, panoramic view of the biggest fight in human history. Agreed (except for the whitewashing of Stalin's monstrous personality in the book) and I think that when you see the evolution of the Russian forces in a mere four years from a scratch start to the enormous and skillfully deployed strategy and tactics that extinguished Japanese forces in China and Siberia in August 1945, you will be astonished. John Erickson’s two volumes on the German-Soviet conflict are also instructive especially on the evolution of the strategic maturity of the forces at each other’s throats during the conflict: The Road to Stalingrad: Stalin`s War with Germany, Volume One The Road to Berlin: Stalin`s War with Germany, Volume Two Anything by David Glantz is instructive and especially his volume detailing the defeat and the rise form the ashes of the Soviet forces in Operations Mars, a bit dated but vital in understanding the battle and its aftermath: Zhukov's Greatest Defeat: The Red Army's Epic Disaster in Operation Mars, 1942 Barbarossa: The Russian-German Conflict, 1941-1945, 1965, Alan Clark -- Splendid rendering of all the special military aspects of the biggest fight in human history.

This segment of the Praxis Series is fairly specific in its scope, and focus. I will not cover repair, or maintenance of all-mechanical Diesels. Nor will I cover lift kits, Diesel tuning, or high-speed go-fast stuff. That said, I will be more than happy to answer any questions you may have about maintenance and care of your Diesel in the comment section. There are myriad reasons I have chosen to go with an older diesel for my SHTF truck, and I will try and articulate them to you so you can see the value these older trucks hold. The big three truck manufacturers all made all-mechanical Diesels. Some of them were manufactured up until the late 1990's. Many readers of this blog are military, or former military, and they will recall the old O.D green K5 Chevy Blazers the Military used to use. The Diesel version of that truck was all-mechanical. It is incumbent upon the reader to choose the right truck based on the condition of the truck on the used market, budget, manufacturer and aestethic preference. For myself, I have chosen a 1989 to 1998.5 Dodge Ram Diesel. I'm a Cummins guy, and I think the Cummins engine is superior to any engine that is comparable to it in the context of older Diesels. Cummins engines can be found in many more places than just under a hood of a Dodge. That's just one of the many reasons I chose Dodge. Parts will be widely available in a post-collapse...

This series of essays have been concentrating on the more innocent and less strong among the population and the caging, maiming and killing that has been targeting the disabled to include the wheelchair-bound, disabled, deaf and blind. This is the last in the series much to the relief of police apologists everywhere. The first four essays can be found here: In Part One, I spoke to the cruelty and violence police are increasingly visiting on the most innocent of all – the animals. In most cases, the cops, in the name of officer safety, maim or kill the canine (and feline) offenders (and cows). In Part Two, I spoke to the cruelty of cops against children. In Part Three, I spoke to the increasing war on woman by the thin black and blue line. In Part Four, I talk about the violence by police against the elderly. Again, the absurd violence visited on these people as a result of whatever wrong they were perceived having done never justifies the sadistic and disproportionate violence that modern cops get away with. Like with the other essays, I have tried to keep the incidents at less than a year old. Most friends and families are touched or know folks who are either disabled or mentally and emotionally handicapped in some fashion. In my experience, those with Down’s Syndrome have been among the most peaceful and loving.
“On his way home, Liko said, “The police followed me.” Liko said, the officer smacked him in the face with an open hand and knocked him to the ground. “His whole hand,” he said. According to the police report, a Miami-Dade Police officer noticed a bulge in Liko’s waistband. The officer attempted to conduct a pat down, and Powell tried to run away.”
The Department, of course, excused the behavior of the police. They are no different from some bully picking on some developmentally disabled child on a playground. The usual fabrication and lies so popular in the police ranks today was caught by surveillance cameras and clearly demonstrated the victim was shot by the cops while making no threatening moves.
“An arrest warrant affidavit charging Bennett with aggravated assault alleged that Bennett had stepped toward the officers with the knife raised in “an aggressive manner.” But neighbor Maurice Bunch’s surveillance video showed that Bennett initially rolled back in his office chair before he stood up. And Bennett was standing completely still with his hands at his sides when Spencer began firing. “There was absolutely no justification for any use of force against Mr. Bennett, much less potentially deadly force,” Tittle wrote in the complaint.”
When you watch the video footage of Spencer shooting mentally-ill Bobby Gerald Bennett in the Oct. 14, 2013 you arrive at one of two conclusions; either Spencer and his partner are sadists who jump at an opportunity to shoot someone or they are simply so scared for their “officer safety” all the time, they shoot and ask questions later. The heroes in blue take down a wheelchair bound man in Rochester, NY. Pepper spraying and beating the man senseless in the process.