Winners and Losers in Libya and on Earth by Kaiser Leib

Foreign intervention is the pride of American policy. It has been our raison d’être for a century, beginning with the Spanish-American war in the late 1890s and continuing without meaningful interruption. The people of these united States are amenable to these constant entanglements, it seems, because our enlightened system of democracy allows us to decide what is best for the rest of the world.

Our latest humanitarian effort is the destruction (and forthcoming rebuilding) of Libya. Our intervention in Libya is justified by international consensus, the dictator’s evilness, access to natural resources, and perhaps the specter of weapons of mass destruction. For this reason it is different and more justified than our entanglement in Afghanistan, which was justified by international consensus, the Taliban’s evilness, access to natural resources, and the bad acts of a wealthy Saudi; or our invasion of Iraq, which was justified by international consensus, the dictator’s evilness, access to natural resources, and the specter of nonexistent weapons of mass destruction.

Libya, I am told, is in Africa, a continent full of people who cannot be trusted with their own governance. This is obvious due to how poorly they’ve behaved themselves when conquered, ruled, armed and raped by Europeans. Furthermore, Africans are incapable of conducting successful revolutions without outside help; this is evidenced by the terrible situation in South Sudan. For this reason, it was absolutely necessary for the Western nations to render the rebels assistance against the Gadaffyduck regime, which had been previously armed by Western nations. After the promised short days (not weeks) of fighting, Gadaffyduck is deposed, and NATO forces have left the country.  This all occurred in March, several months ago.

The new Libyan government will be democratic, in the spirit of Afghanistan, Iraq, and the first French Republic. This will guarantee that the human rights of the Libyan people will be respected, and that the NATO powers will have uninterrupted access to Libya’s oil reserves. The National Transition Council (NTC), Libya’s interim government, is largely Muslim; this meets with popular approval after years of secular rule. Muslim populations ought to be allowed to select Muslim leaders, except in Palestine and Iran.

The Korean war persists into its sixth decade, complete with military bases and US troops. Okinawa and Rammstein remain occupied, just in case. Our boys at Guantanamo Bay remain ever-vigilant against the Spanish threat of the 19th century. Poland is a member of NATO, which still has a purpose years after the dissolution of the Warsaw pact. The sun rises, the sun sets, and hastens to the place from which it rose. Still I Hope for Change.

kaiserleib
kaiserleib@gmail.com
3 Comments
  • Rodney
    Posted at 19:55h, 26 August Reply

    Palestine? Do you mean the land formerly belonging to Jordan?

  • Linda Brady Traynham
    Posted at 22:40h, 27 August Reply

    My name K’A’to, known as “the Courageous but Cautious,” famed for skill with club “Slayer” and arguing with tribal elders against farming and domesticating animals. Did fine hunting, gathering, and inventing beer.

    Explain, please, to Neanderthal Conservative how right to attack Lib’y’a? Not do you any harm. Me think not right rain hurt out of skies too high for Lib’y’ans defend theyselves. You hurt small ones, destroy caves, kill not-fighters. Real mens fight faces to faces. Not say “Other nations say okay!” Real mens have thing we call “conscience” tell us right from wrong. We not agree, I pick up Slayer. You look at Slayer and muscles, maybe decide not want to fight. Might decide to chance it.

    You write joke K’A’to not understand? Smartest man in tribe but beetle brow not leave much room for brains. Some mighty nation. Six months and pay others to fight you war on ground and still not win for sure? K’A’to get mad at Col Qadifi, go to palace, explain why he act bad. He not change, I whack with Slayer and be king. Even bad king better than best Council. Kings always die. Laws and regulations harder to kill.

  • mot
    Posted at 05:10h, 28 August Reply

    Kaiser, you’ve once again pointed out the obvious. The truly sad part about all of this is that its gotten to the point where I can read the tea leaves. Almost like a bad script being filmed over and over again. Why? Because the “directors” have pulled it off before. No need to fix what ain’t broken. In the meantime the ticket and concession prices have gone up to this latest disaster epic: Our own destruction.

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